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Saturday Night At The Movies

GORDONSMITH7

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Like southfieldhibby, i'm looking forward to seeing First Man when it comes out starring Ryan Gosling as Neil Armstrong. Loved Damien Cazelle's first two movies Whiplash and La La Land so hopefully this will be another great one.
I read a rave review of this at the weekend. Looks very good. On general release this Friday.

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One for the rude boys and auld skins to look forward to. I bought a tremendous Trojan compilation in 1973. I was turned onto all this stuff back in 1968 while still at school when I bought the splendid single It Mek by Desmond Dekker.
Click.
Rudeboy: The Story Of Trojan Records - Trojan Records


The seeds for the multicultural society we live in now were formed on the dancefloor back in the day,’ says Don Letts by way of introduction to Nicolas Jack Davies’ documentary about Trojan Records, which celebrates its 50th anniversary this year. The company was founded by Windrush immigrant Lee Gopthal, against a backdrop of rising racial hatred. Rudeboy charts the label’s evolution from 1960s ska and rock-steady to the chart-topping hits that introduced reggae to a global audience, while also recalling the prejudice that the music’s pioneering artists and producers had to overcome in London. Blending original interviews with evocative archive footage and cinematic reconstructions, the film is a timely celebration of British Jamaican working-class youth culture, style and ingenuity.

Manish Agarwal


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Two Headed Boy

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I watched "I, Tonya" last night on Amazon Prime. Very entertaining biopic of controversial figure skater Tonya Harding. It's very Scorcesse esque in the way it spans three decades of a life with a jukebox soundtrack, characters talking directly to the audience etc...

Recommended.
 

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Don't go the movies to see things I want too often, usually Marvel stuff for the lad or most recent Mamma Mia with my wife. Was mildly entertaining, simply based on the young lead female character being tremendous on the eye.

The new Neil Armstrong movie looks outstanding, will be going to see it.
Interesting to hear thoughts on this, I went to see it tonight.
 

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Interesting to hear thoughts on this, I went to see it tonight.
Saw it today. Initial reaction is I loved it, was superb. Some of the way it was filmed made he feel queezy, but that’s obviously deliberate. Brilliant movie.
 

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22 July on Netflix. Paul Greengrass’ film about Anders Brevik’s murder of 70 kids in Norway. Powerful stuff but I can’t help thinking that a few nut jobs will watch and think he was a hero.


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Watched this last night...

Searching

Called 'Searching'. Most engrossing film I've seen for a long long time. Innovative too.

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GORDONSMITH7

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Watched this last night...

Searching

Called 'Searching'. Most engrossing film I've seen for a long long time. Innovative too.

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Tried to get it on Prime amigo. Not available.
 

GORDONSMITH7

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Two tonight on Film 4 worth recording. One for Arty Fartys and one for Musos. So that's me sorted amigos.
Mr Turner (11.30)

Timothy Spall is an acting genius in my opinion.

Cert 12A; 149 mins
Dir: Mike Leigh. Starring: Timothy Spall, Dorothy Atkinson, Marion Bailey, Paul Jesson, Lesley Manville


In the new Mike Leigh film, Mr Turner, you can hardly miss the Mister. Joseph Mallord William is a sore thumb from the opening scene, where he’s sketching a windmill somewhere in rural Holland, poised like a pot-bellied stork among the rushes. The scene tells you everything you need to know about the man and the places he feels happiest: in short, it’s landscape as portrait, and Turner would have smiled at that.
Leigh’s film is a supremely enjoyable biopic of the English artist known as “the painter of light” – someone whose canvases, which revelled in the possibilities of colour and movement, could almost be early forerunners of cinema.
Turner is played by Timothy Spall, who gives the finest performance of his career to date, surpassing even his work in Leigh’s Secrets & Lies 18 years ago. It won Spall the best actor prize at Cannes this year, and the question now is just how far the role can take him: the the Baftas, almost inevitably; as far as the Oscars, very possibly. It’s a musty performance, one that gets in your clothes and hair, and that’s absolutely meant as a compliment. Spall coughs and shambles about the place like a moulting, phlegmy Gruffalo, eyes bright and hungry, bottom lip jutting proudly forward like the spout of a custard jug.
His repertoire of grunts alone comfortably extends past a hundred, and you wonder if perhaps Spall went Method for the role, living for years in a sty until he got the voice, posture and smell just right. But beyond the troughfuls of fun tics, Spall makes Turner tenderly and totally human, which has the effect of making his artistic talents seem even more God-given.

The film begins in 1826, with Turner 51 years old and in the ascendant. He works from a studio in his London town house, where his housekeeper Hannah (Dorothy Atkinson) and elderly father, William Senior (Paul Jesson), keep things ticking over.

Turner’s dealings with them both, including solemn groping of the former, are brisk and straightforward. The painting process, though, is very different: Leigh shoots it in a way that it sometimes resembles an occult ritual. Early in the film, when Turner’s father visits a paint shop to replenish his son’s supplies, you see the pigments are piled up on silver platters, like spices in a souk, or potion ingredients, begging to be mixed.

Light is what moves Turner, and he moves with the light. The film spans the quarter-century until his death in 1851, and we follow him wherever he goes. At a patron’s country estate, he tussles with a gloomy rival (Martin Savage) and tries to sing a Purcell aria – he does it amusingly badly but also tenderly, and finding the precise point of articulation between the two is pure, neat Leigh.
His repertoire of grunts alone comfortably extends past a hundred, and you wonder if perhaps Spall went Method for the role, living for years in a sty until he got the voice, posture and smell just right. But beyond the troughfuls of fun tics, Spall makes Turner tenderly and totally human, which has the effect of making his artistic talents seem even more God-given.

The film begins in 1826, with Turner 51 years old and in the ascendant. He works from a studio in his London town house, where his housekeeper Hannah (Dorothy Atkinson) and elderly father, William Senior (Paul Jesson), keep things ticking over.

Turner’s dealings with them both, including solemn groping of the former, are brisk and straightforward. The painting process, though, is very different: Leigh shoots it in a way that it sometimes resembles an occult ritual. Early in the film, when Turner’s father visits a paint shop to replenish his son’s supplies, you see the pigments are piled up on silver platters, like spices in a souk, or potion ingredients, begging to be mixed.

Light is what moves Turner, and he moves with the light. The film spans the quarter-century until his death in 1851, and we follow him wherever he goes. At a patron’s country estate, he tussles with a gloomy rival (Martin Savage) and tries to sing a Purcell aria – he does it amusingly badly but also tenderly, and finding the precise point of articulation between the two is pure, neat Leigh.
In Margate, Turner meets a friendly landlady (Marion Bailey), who comes to play an important role in his later life. At the Royal Academy, we see him buzzing around, joking with friends, dishing out advice and, in a perfect, self-contained skit, winding up John Constable (James Fleet).

The film is studded with such gem-like supporting roles, many of which are taken by regular Leigh players, including Lesley Manville and Ruth Sheen. Picking favourites is too difficult, but let’s just say the lisping writer and patron John Ruskin, hilariously played by Joshua McGuire as an oblivious smartypants, has stwuck a chord with a few of us cwitics.

In its shape, Mr Turner is very much like Topsy-Turvy, Leigh’s superb, under-seen 1999 film about the comic-opera writers WS Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan, set during the writing of The Mikado. But this is an even more ambitious work about the making of art, in which the process is not just shown as an almighty, if often very funny, strain, but something that, when done correctly, and with the stars aligned just so, can bear the artist past death and into history.

When Leigh recreates the scene that inspired Turner’s 1839 masterpiece The Fighting Temeraire, he shows the artist finding hope not in the old, exhausted warship being tugged to her last berth, but the squat, blackened tugboat in front.

“The ghost of the past,” says one of his friends, nodding sorrowfully at the larger vessel.

“No,” Turner barks. “The past is the past. You’re observing the future! Smoke. Iron. Steam!” Leigh and Spall’s genius is to show us both in one man: Turner is future and past, progress and history, tugboat and Temeraire.



BIG G
 

beefy

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Tried to get it on Prime amigo. Not available.
Oops! I watched it on me Firestick. So many platforms nowadays

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GORDONSMITH7

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Two tonight on Film 4 worth recording. One for Arty Fartys and one for Musos. So that's me sorted amigos.
Mr Turner (11.30)

Timothy Spall is an acting genius in my opinion.

Cert 12A; 149 mins
Dir: Mike Leigh. Starring: Timothy Spall, Dorothy Atkinson, Marion Bailey, Paul Jesson, Lesley Manville


In the new Mike Leigh film, Mr Turner, you can hardly miss the Mister. Joseph Mallord William is a sore thumb from the opening scene, where he’s sketching a windmill somewhere in rural Holland, poised like a pot-bellied stork among the rushes. The scene tells you everything you need to know about the man and the places he feels happiest: in short, it’s landscape as portrait, and Turner would have smiled at that.
Leigh’s film is a supremely enjoyable biopic of the English artist known as “the painter of light” – someone whose canvases, which revelled in the possibilities of colour and movement, could almost be early forerunners of cinema.
Turner is played by Timothy Spall, who gives the finest performance of his career to date, surpassing even his work in Leigh’s Secrets & Lies 18 years ago. It won Spall the best actor prize at Cannes this year, and the question now is just how far the role can take him: the the Baftas, almost inevitably; as far as the Oscars, very possibly. It’s a musty performance, one that gets in your clothes and hair, and that’s absolutely meant as a compliment. Spall coughs and shambles about the place like a moulting, phlegmy Gruffalo, eyes bright and hungry, bottom lip jutting proudly forward like the spout of a custard jug.
His repertoire of grunts alone comfortably extends past a hundred, and you wonder if perhaps Spall went Method for the role, living for years in a sty until he got the voice, posture and smell just right. But beyond the troughfuls of fun tics, Spall makes Turner tenderly and totally human, which has the effect of making his artistic talents seem even more God-given.

The film begins in 1826, with Turner 51 years old and in the ascendant. He works from a studio in his London town house, where his housekeeper Hannah (Dorothy Atkinson) and elderly father, William Senior (Paul Jesson), keep things ticking over.

Turner’s dealings with them both, including solemn groping of the former, are brisk and straightforward. The painting process, though, is very different: Leigh shoots it in a way that it sometimes resembles an occult ritual. Early in the film, when Turner’s father visits a paint shop to replenish his son’s supplies, you see the pigments are piled up on silver platters, like spices in a souk, or potion ingredients, begging to be mixed.

Light is what moves Turner, and he moves with the light. The film spans the quarter-century until his death in 1851, and we follow him wherever he goes. At a patron’s country estate, he tussles with a gloomy rival (Martin Savage) and tries to sing a Purcell aria – he does it amusingly badly but also tenderly, and finding the precise point of articulation between the two is pure, neat Leigh.
His repertoire of grunts alone comfortably extends past a hundred, and you wonder if perhaps Spall went Method for the role, living for years in a sty until he got the voice, posture and smell just right. But beyond the troughfuls of fun tics, Spall makes Turner tenderly and totally human, which has the effect of making his artistic talents seem even more God-given.

The film begins in 1826, with Turner 51 years old and in the ascendant. He works from a studio in his London town house, where his housekeeper Hannah (Dorothy Atkinson) and elderly father, William Senior (Paul Jesson), keep things ticking over.

Turner’s dealings with them both, including solemn groping of the former, are brisk and straightforward. The painting process, though, is very different: Leigh shoots it in a way that it sometimes resembles an occult ritual. Early in the film, when Turner’s father visits a paint shop to replenish his son’s supplies, you see the pigments are piled up on silver platters, like spices in a souk, or potion ingredients, begging to be mixed.

Light is what moves Turner, and he moves with the light. The film spans the quarter-century until his death in 1851, and we follow him wherever he goes. At a patron’s country estate, he tussles with a gloomy rival (Martin Savage) and tries to sing a Purcell aria – he does it amusingly badly but also tenderly, and finding the precise point of articulation between the two is pure, neat Leigh.
In Margate, Turner meets a friendly landlady (Marion Bailey), who comes to play an important role in his later life. At the Royal Academy, we see him buzzing around, joking with friends, dishing out advice and, in a perfect, self-contained skit, winding up John Constable (James Fleet).

The film is studded with such gem-like supporting roles, many of which are taken by regular Leigh players, including Lesley Manville and Ruth Sheen. Picking favourites is too difficult, but let’s just say the lisping writer and patron John Ruskin, hilariously played by Joshua McGuire as an oblivious smartypants, has stwuck a chord with a few of us cwitics.

In its shape, Mr Turner is very much like Topsy-Turvy, Leigh’s superb, under-seen 1999 film about the comic-opera writers WS Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan, set during the writing of The Mikado. But this is an even more ambitious work about the making of art, in which the process is not just shown as an almighty, if often very funny, strain, but something that, when done correctly, and with the stars aligned just so, can bear the artist past death and into history.

When Leigh recreates the scene that inspired Turner’s 1839 masterpiece The Fighting Temeraire, he shows the artist finding hope not in the old, exhausted warship being tugged to her last berth, but the squat, blackened tugboat in front.

“The ghost of the past,” says one of his friends, nodding sorrowfully at the larger vessel.

“No,” Turner barks. “The past is the past. You’re observing the future! Smoke. Iron. Steam!” Leigh and Spall’s genius is to show us both in one man: Turner is future and past, progress and history, tugboat and Temeraire.



BIG G
The other following this is....

The Possibilities Are Endless
(0215)
Henry Barnes
James Hall and Edward Lovelace’s documentary is about the post-stroke recovery of Edwyn Collins, the singer/songwriter who fronted the Scottish alt-rock band Orange Juice. There’s a disjointed beauty in this visualisation of a man struggling to recollect the facts of his life; a lot of power in the fight to rebuild the link between brain and location. Hall and Lovelace have skirted the temptation to make a conventional documentary; instead they immerse us in the experience, as confusing and frightening as it is. They dig beauty out of tragedy without being too neat about it and have made a remarkable film.



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moathibby

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I went to see a film called 1945 a couple of days ago,it's a Hungarian film with subtitles.But don't let that put you off,it was very good.The plot was two Jews turn up at a train station in Hungary and start heading towards a small town with two trunks seemingly full of cosmetics.This sets the whole town into turmoil as dark secrets are revealed.The film is beautifully shot in black and white,with some excellent performances.I should imagine this will upset Victor Orban and his ruling party.Good!Go see.
 

GORDONSMITH7

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I went to see a film called 1945 a couple of days ago,it's a Hungarian film with subtitles.But don't let that put you off,it was very good.The plot was two Jews turn up at a train station in Hungary and start heading towards a small town with two trunks seemingly full of cosmetics.This sets the whole town into turmoil as dark secrets are revealed.The film is beautifully shot in black and white,with some excellent performances.I should imagine this will upset Victor Orban and his ruling party.Good!Go see.
I read several good reviews of that film Moaty.

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moathibby

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I've not read all the posts.But I notice there was some talk about Rudeboy. Which I want to see when I can.I notice it has been commented about by Don Letts.Whom I believe has some connection with Rude Boy the film about the Clash.
I hope there are not too many mix ups with the similar titles.Although I would imagine if a punter who gets the wrong film as a pressie won't be too dissapointed with the results.
On a completely different note I am looking forward to seeing Peterloo which is set to come out soon.I hope that it has the same sort of impact that I Daniel Blake had earlier.
 

Bofahibee

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I've not read all the posts.But I notice there was some talk about Rudeboy. Which I want to see when I can.I notice it has been commented about by Don Letts.Whom I believe has some connection with Rude Boy the film about the Clash.
I hope there are not too many mix ups with the similar titles.Although I would imagine if a punter who gets the wrong film as a pressie won't be too dissapointed with the results.
On a completely different note I am looking forward to seeing Peterloo which is set to come out soon.I hope that it has the same sort of impact that I Daniel Blake had earlier.
I saw a photo of Tim McInerney in Peterloo today and assumed it was from Blackadder.


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Just back from seeing "Us".

Superb! I was looking forward to this after really enjoying Jordan Peele's first film Get Out and it did not disappointed at all.

Far more visceral and scary than Get Out but more subtle with its core message.

Great performances, some big laughs and it rarely goes for the easy jump scare.

If you're a horror fan its a must, but I'd recommend it to anyone who can handle their nerves being jangled.
 
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GORDONSMITH7

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Just back from seeing "Us".

Superb! I was looking forward to this after really enjoying Jordan Peele's first film Get Out and it did not disappointed at all.

Far more visceral and scary than Get Out but more subtle with its core message.

Great performances, some big laughs and it rarely goes for the easy jump scare.

If you're a horror fan its a must, but I'd recommend it to anyone who can handle their nerves being jangled.
Saw it the other night at Omni. Was chortling at some of the dark humour. Splendid.

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GORDONSMITH7

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Father's Day gift from Danny. We saw the Diego Maradona film at the Cameo cinema on Monday night. Absolutely splendid. Recommended.

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Going to see Rocketman this week-end which as an Elton fan I am looking forward to.

Update; Saw it tonight....fantastic.
 
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Two Headed Boy

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Saw both "toys that come to life" movies in the cinema this week. Family trip for Toy Story 4 and just me and the missus for Child's Play. Both were highly entertaining in their own way.

Toy Story 4 is easily as good as the other three in the series and managed to delight without being too surprising. Funny, great looking animation and a heartwarming story. Delivers everything you'd want from it really.

Child's Play was great fun too and is far better than I expected it to be. It wont be for everyone, but if you like gory, silly, popcorn horror flicks then you'll have a blast. Far more enjoyable than the dreary Freddy, Jason and Texas Chainsaw reboots that have surfaced over the last few years.
 

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