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Hibees bounce Top albums - The Countdown

#51 - What's Going On - Marvin Gaye

What's Going On is the eleventh studio album by American soul singer Marvin Gaye.

What's Going On is a concept album with most of its songs segueing into the next. The narrative established by the songs is told from the point of view of a Vietnam veteran returning to his home country to witness hatred, suffering, and injustice.

Gaye had also been deeply affected by the social ills plaguing the United States at the time. The singer's brother Frankie wrote in his 2003 autobiography that after telling Marvin stories from his time in Vietnam, Gaye told his brother: "I didn't know how to fight before, but now I think I do. I just have to do it my way. I'm not a painter. I'm not a poet. But I can do it with music."

The album was an immediate commercial and critical success, and came to be viewed by music historians as a classic of 1970s soul and one of the greatest albums of all time.

Critic Reviews:

"What's Going On is not only Marvin Gaye's masterpiece, it's the most important and passionate record to come out of soul music, delivered by one of its finest voices, a man finally free to speak his mind and so move from R&B sex symbol to true recording artist."

"A divinely inspired work driven by social rage – one that braided doo-wop harmonies, jazz and the hymns Gaye had loved as a child."

 
Further to the Thin Lizzy album I've just read this.....

THIN LIZZY: Live And Dangerous (Universal Deluxe Edition)

The new package, overseen by guitarist Scott Gorham and available as an 8-CD box set (£67) as well as on streaming platforms, gathers together all six of the shows pooled for the initial LP.
Also included is a 1978 London gig, plus a remastered version of the original album.

Despite the inevitable repetition (and there's a lot of it), it's a rewarding exercise — not an album to listen to in a single sitting, but one to be dipped into, one show at a time.
This reissue also sheds fresh light on one of rock's great debates.

There have been suggestions that Live And Dangerous isn't strictly a live album at all.

Producer Tony Visconti, who delayed work on David Bowie's Lodger to mix the original selection of songs, has claimed large parts of the 1978 album were spruced up with studio overdubs.

The band have always denied skulduggery, admitting only that some off-key backing vocals were replaced and a few technical glitches fixed.

Without settling the controversy, the gigs reproduced in full here support the band's side of the argument by reiterating what a tight, professional outfit they were onstage.
I was sent the 8 disc edition to review yesterday along with a 2 disc Live Richard Hawley album and the new Gaz Coombes album.
Have listen to the last 2 and now have to face the marathon TL L&D set!!!
 
I was sent the 8 disc edition to review yesterday along with a 2 disc Live Richard Hawley album and the new Gaz Coombes album.
Have listen to the last 2 and now have to face the marathon TL L&D set!!!
Let us know how you get on with them mate. Cheers
 
Let us know how you get on with them mate. Cheers
Who buys these monster sized live sets other than bonkers fans of particular bands?

I was sent a 5 disc Slade live box set a month ago. It was 5 gigs over an 7 or 8 year period.
Once I got started it was an interesting listen over a few days and I learned they actually improved as live players in the late 70's.
 
Will do.
Who buys these monster sized live sets other than bonkers fans of particular bands?

I was sent a 5 disc Slade live box set a month ago.
Once I got started it was an interesting listen over a few days and I learned they were actually improved as live players in the late 70's.
Always liked Slade. Their film Slade in Flame is on Yatube last time i looked
 
I was sent the 8 disc edition to review yesterday along with a 2 disc Live Richard Hawley album and the new Gaz Coombes album.
Have listen to the last 2 and now have to face the marathon TL L&D set!!!
How was the Hawley live album? Don't think he's recorded anything for a few years.
 
Always liked Slade. Their film Slade in Flame is on Yatube last time i looked
Yeah, we all loved Slade as kids.
Saw the film at the flicks when I was 14 or 15 and had the album which was good And a bit different from them.

Noddy Holder did a one night talk show at the Edinburgh festival in August.
It was strange seeing him as a little old man.
He had lots of great stories.
 
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How was the Hawley live album? Don't think he's recorded anything for a few years.
I bought his initial albums when they came out and saw him live a few times..
Not many folk were listening to him at the time.
Then the "Coles Corner" album came along and turned it for him.
I bought the 3 albums after that then checked out after 2012.

His live album was recorded in Halifax.
It's fine. Mixes up his noisy and quiet stuff. I've only listened to it once.
He's a funny guy so his between song banter is good.
He would be a great guy to go for a pint with and I bet he has a great record collection.

I've listened to the Gaz Coombes album twice.
It's a good listen. 4 star jobby.
 
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#50 - Blue Lines - Massive Attack

Blue Lines is the debut studio album by English electronic music group Massive Attack.

Blue Lines is generally considered the first trip hop album, although the term was not widely used until a few years after its release.

A fusion of electronic music, hip hop, dub, 1970s soul and reggae, it established Massive Attack as one of the most innovative British bands of the 1990s and the founder of trip hop's Bristol sound.

Critic Reviews:

"Listening to Massive Attack's debut album, Blue Lines, 21 years after its initial release is like reading an old William Gibson novel that describes the then-near future, which is now the present, with unsettling precision. Nearly every song offers a sound currently in use in music's taste-making leading edge."

"Blue Lines melded 'dance' styles like no other album before it. It was 'soul music', shot through with an acute melancholy."

 
#49 - Buena Vista Social Club - Buena Vista Social Club

Buena Vista Social Club is the debut album by the Buena Vista Social Club, an ensemble of Cuban musicians established in 1996. They named the group after a members-only club that was opened in Havana in pre-Castro times, a period of unbelievable musical activity in Cuba.

A critical and commercial success, the majority of the album comprises standards of the trova and filin repertoire.

Buena Vista Social Club achieved considerable sales in Europe, reaching the Top 10 in several countries.

Critic Reviews:

"The ensemble was always about more than music – they were living lessons in life that were embraced by many listeners who loved their implicit message that sweet music could still be ahead as our youth recedes in the rear-view mirror."

"If you get one album of Cuban music, this should be the one."

 
#48 - Closer - Joy Division

Closer is the second and final studio album by English rock band Joy Division.

The songs on Closer were drawn from two distinct periods. The earlier guitar-driven compositions were written during the latter half of 1979: "Atrocity Exhibition", "Passover", "Colony", "A Means to an End" and "Twenty Four Hours". All were played live during that year, with some being recorded for various radio sessions. The album's other songs were written in early 1980, and included more prominent use of synthesisers: "Isolation", "Heart and Soul", "The Eternal" and "Decades".

Produced by Martin Hannett, it was released two months after the suicide of the band's lead singer and lyricist Ian Curtis.

Critic Reviews:

"The connection between Curtis’ sad demise and the lyrics is impossible to ignore. The album burns with distress and foreboding, the songs seeming to drag us deeper into the depths of Curtis’ despairing mind, as we bear witness to his tortured words. "

"Closer remains a brutal, challenging listen. It is a record that scrapes its ragged edges and shattered emotions along your heart."

 
#47 - Disco - Pet Shop Boys

Disco is the first remix album by English synth-pop duo Pet Shop Boys.

Disco consists of remixes of tracks from the band's debut album Please and its respective B-sides and was released to showcase music the duo deemed non-radio friendly. With the exception of "Suburbia", all the mixes on Disco were either rare import remixes or previously unreleased.

Critic Reviews:

"'Opportunities' b-side 'In The Night' is a classic example of the multi-faceted brilliance of the duo - a song written about the Parisians called les Zazous, who defied the strictures of Nazi occupation by listening to jazz and growing their hair long, it managed to be used as the theme music for BBC fashion programme The Clothes Show while at the same time sounding like a long-lost cold wave classic."

"Even at these extended lengths, the melodic craft of the Pet Shop Boys' material shines through."

 
#46 - Kind of Blue - Miles Davis

Kind of Blue is a studio album by American jazz trumpeter, composer, and bandleader Miles Davis.

Basing Kind of Blue entirely on modality, Davis departed further from his early hard bop style in favor of greater experimentation with musical modes. He gave each performer a set of scales that encompassed the parameters of their improvisation and style, and consequently more creative freedom with melodies.

Kind of Blue is regarded by many critics as Davis's masterpiece, often cited as the greatest jazz record ever recorded, and one of the best albums of all time in general.

Critic Reviews:

"Miles Davis's Kind of Blue belongs to that special class of album that everybody treasures immediately and then, over time, goes on to process in his or her own terms. For some, it's a masterpiece so resounding in its effect as to make the rest of "jazz" extraneous (or at least reasonably deferred until some later point when older or more patient)."

"Consistently rated not just as one of the greatest jazz albums but as one of THE greatest musical statements of the 20th century."

 
Excellent albums these last few.
 
#50 - Blue Lines - Massive Attack

Blue Lines is the debut studio album by English electronic music group Massive Attack.

Blue Lines is generally considered the first trip hop album, although the term was not widely used until a few years after its release.

A fusion of electronic music, hip hop, dub, 1970s soul and reggae, it established Massive Attack as one of the most innovative British bands of the 1990s and the founder of trip hop's Bristol sound.

Critic Reviews:

"Listening to Massive Attack's debut album, Blue Lines, 21 years after its initial release is like reading an old William Gibson novel that describes the then-near future, which is now the present, with unsettling precision. Nearly every song offers a sound currently in use in music's taste-making leading edge."

"Blue Lines melded 'dance' styles like no other album before it. It was 'soul music', shot through with an acute melancholy."

My brother has a rare vinyl edition of this when they had to change their name to Massive during the first Gulf War. Must be worth a bob or two now. Great album. As were their next two as well.
 
Excellent albums these last few.
There are a couple of mainstream pop-rock albums and a compilation to go that might create debate, but we are getting into an "undisputed classics" run until the end now.
 
There are a couple of mainstream pop-rock albums and a compilation to go that might create debate, but we are getting into an "undisputed classics" run until the end now.
Fantastic thread as I've already said. Can't say I've really discovered much that I didn't know or anything new that I like. Critics reviews are comedy gold though
 
Fantastic thread as I've already said. Can't say I've really discovered much that I didn't know or anything new that I like. Critics reviews are comedy gold though
I've hardly listened to any Jazz in my puff. This thread has opened my ears to a few classics I'll be spinning again.
 
I've hardly listened to any Jazz in my puff. This thread has opened my ears to a few classics I'll be spinning again.
I need to understand jazz a bit more. Where I live the cafes, hotels, and restaurants play that god awful jazz piano pish where a dozen notes are better than one. Makes me want to smash the speakers off the walls. Not a good start 😀
 
#45 - Aladdin Sane - David Bowie

Aladdin Sane is the sixth studio album by David Bowie.

The follow-up to his breakthrough The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars, it was the first album he wrote and released from a position of stardom. It was produced by Bowie and Ken Scott and features contributions from Bowie's backing band the Spiders from Mars.

Preceded by the singles "The Jean Genie" and "Drive-In Saturday", Aladdin Sane was Bowie's most commercially successful record up to that point, topping the UK Albums Chart and helped garner immense popularity for Bowie.

Critic Reviews:

"Aladdin Sane is one of the finest forty-five minutes in rock. 'Crack, baby, crack; show me you're real' he demands on ''Cracked Actor'': a chameleon lost, for one glorious moment, in his own camouflage."

"A lighter affair than Ziggy Stardust, Aladdin Sane is actually a stranger album than its predecessor, buoyed by bizarre lounge-jazz flourishes."

 
#44 - All Mod Cons - The Jam

All Mod Cons is the third studio album by The Jam.

British Invasion pop influences run through the album, most obviously in the cover of The Kinks' "David Watts". The single "Down in the Tube Station at Midnight", which Weller had originally discarded because he was unhappy with the song's arrangement, was rescued from the studio bin by producer Vic Coppersmith and became one of the band's most successful chart hits up to that point.

Thoug their mod influences were apparent, The Jam were still popular with punk fans thanks in part their socially concious lyrics. "Class issues were very important to me at that time ..." said Weller. "Woking has a bit of a stockbroker belt on its outskirts. So I had those images – people catching the train to Waterloo to go to the city. 'Mr Clean' was my view of that."

Critic Reviews:

"Although their ideas strengthened in its wake, never again were they as tight, incisive and fresh as on ‘All Mod Cons’, the album for which they will always be remembered and whose influence is plastered all over the sound of this decade."

"The Jam regrouped and refocused for All Mod Cons, an album that marked a great leap in songwriting maturity and sense of purpose."

 
#43 - Remain In Light - Talking Heads

Remain in Light is the fourth studio album by Talking Heads.

Drawing influence from Nigerian musician Fela Kuti, the band experimented with African polyrhythms, funk, and electronics, recording instrumental tracks as a series of looping grooves.

Frontman David Byrne struggled with writer's block while writing the album, but adopted a scattered, stream-of-consciousness lyrical style as a result inspired by early rap and academic literature on Africa.

Remain in Light was acclaimed by critics, who praised its sonic experimentation, rhythmic innovations, and cohesive merging of disparate genres. It spawned the singles "Once in a Lifetime" and "Houses in Motion".

Critic Reviews:

"The album presents such a strange artistic vision, foreign to what came before but operating as though it were the culmination of a long tradition, that it seems to declare the power of weirdness itself. To be not just strange but singular, to reinvent a form in a way that you can dance to, to smuggle beer into the museum: This is the visceral thrill of art. We want to deny it on theoretical grounds, but we can’t. So we must revise our theories."

"While the album wasn't exactly brimming with singles, it contains three of the band's greatest ever songs and is lifted with every new track."

 
#42 - The Queen is Dead - The Smiths

The Queen Is Dead is the third studio album by The Smiths.

The album was produced by frontman Morrissey and guitarist Johnny Marr, working predominantly with engineer Stephen Street, who had engineered the band's previous album Meat Is Murder. Street recalled: "Morrissey, Johnny and I had a really good working relationship – we were all roughly the same age and into the same kind of things, so everyone felt quite relaxed in the studio".

The album is generally considered to be the band’s best work (although the bands primary songwirters Morrissey and Marr prefer Strangeways, Here We Come) it features the singles "Bigmouth Strikes Again" and "The Boy With The Thorn in his Side" and the iconic album track "There Is A Light That Never Goes Out".

Critic Reviews:

"When Morrissey’s sighs are caressed by Marr’s serene, synthesized strings on “There Is a Light,” or when the singer’s wordless falsetto flutters amid the guitarist’s golden cascades in “Boy with the Thorn,” there’s something miraculous about the way their textures mesh."

"The Queen Is Dead is the band's most prolific musical statement both instrumentally and lyrically."

 
#41- Blood on the Tracks - Bob Dylan

Blood on the Tracks is the fifteenth studio album by Bob Dylan.

Blood on the Tracks initially received mixed reviews, but has subsequently been acclaimed as one of Dylan's greatest albums by both critics and fans.

The songs have been linked to tensions in Dylan's personal life, including his estrangement from his then-wife Sara. One of their children, Jakob Dylan, has described the songs as "my parents talking". However, in interviews, Dylan has denied that the songs on the album are autobiographical.

Critic Reviews:

"Perhaps the least dated of Dylan’s recordings, there is a nakedness to everything. Untainted by the politics and cool of the ’60s or the gated drums and overdubbed productions of the ’80s, Blood on the Tracks hits with the same immediacy in the 21st century as it did in 1975."

"This is an album alternately bitter, sorrowful, regretful, and peaceful, easily the closest he ever came to wearing his emotions on his sleeve."

 
#41- Blood on the Tracks - Bob Dylan

Blood on the Tracks is the fifteenth studio album by Bob Dylan.

Blood on the Tracks initially received mixed reviews, but has subsequently been acclaimed as one of Dylan's greatest albums by both critics and fans.

The songs have been linked to tensions in Dylan's personal life, including his estrangement from his then-wife Sara. One of their children, Jakob Dylan, has described the songs as "my parents talking". However, in interviews, Dylan has denied that the songs on the album are autobiographical.

Critic Reviews:

"Perhaps the least dated of Dylan’s recordings, there is a nakedness to everything. Untainted by the politics and cool of the ’60s or the gated drums and overdubbed productions of the ’80s, Blood on the Tracks hits with the same immediacy in the 21st century as it did in 1975."

"This is an album alternately bitter, sorrowful, regretful, and peaceful, easily the closest he ever came to wearing his emotions on his sleeve."

His best album IMHO and my gateway to his back catalogue.
 
His best album IMHO and my gateway to his back catalogue.
Absolutely superb album
 
#45 - Aladdin Sane - David Bowie

Aladdin Sane is the sixth studio album by David Bowie.

The follow-up to his breakthrough The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars, it was the first album he wrote and released from a position of stardom. It was produced by Bowie and Ken Scott and features contributions from Bowie's backing band the Spiders from Mars.

Preceded by the singles "The Jean Genie" and "Drive-In Saturday", Aladdin Sane was Bowie's most commercially successful record up to that point, topping the UK Albums Chart and helped garner immense popularity for Bowie.

Critic Reviews:

"Aladdin Sane is one of the finest forty-five minutes in rock. 'Crack, baby, crack; show me you're real' he demands on ''Cracked Actor'': a chameleon lost, for one glorious moment, in his own camouflage."

"A lighter affair than Ziggy Stardust, Aladdin Sane is actually a stranger album than its predecessor, buoyed by bizarre lounge-jazz flourishes."

An odd album in many ways, as the blurb also picks up. But that was all stuff I noticed later as what got my goat - after discovering Ziggy and only after that Hunky Dory - was whi the feck was this pianist coming in to ruin the show??!

I could still hear much reduced bits by Mick Ronson but this Mike Garson (sp?) pianist took me about a month - really - to completely go 180° on and decide it was inspired genius. Bowie probs just liked him cos he had such a different style from most pop pianists in those days. Garson wasn't scared to bring in his avant-garde stuff tho I do seem to recall an interview at the time that he was very nervous indeed on his audition.

Whatever, Time is a classic with wonderful chords that force-march you through the song, Watch That Man is a foot-stomping starter I remember liking on first hearing on a cold pillow in a freezin bedroom in Burdiehouse by the gift of Radio Luxemburg on what was the only tranny I knew about :)

Finally, always worth an extra mention as a beautifully-crafted piece of song-writing, Lady Grinning Soul was a sweet pleasure to fall asleep to at night as the brilliant curtain-closer.

I learned a lot from this LP and would recommend anyone - including bizarrely anti-piano late-teenagers - to have a good headphone session with.
 
An odd album in many ways, as the blurb also picks up. But that was all stuff I noticed later as what got my goat - after discovering Ziggy and only after that Hunky Dory - was whi the feck was this pianist coming in to ruin the show??!

I could still hear much reduced bits by Mick Ronson but this Mike Garson (sp?) pianist took me about a month - really - to completely go 180° on and decide it was inspired genius. Bowie probs just liked him cos he had such a different style from most pop pianists in those days. Garson wasn't scared to bring in his avant-garde stuff tho I do seem to recall an interview at the time that he was very nervous indeed on his audition.

Whatever, Time is a classic with wonderful chords that force-march you through the song, Watch That Man is a foot-stomping starter I remember liking on first hearing on a cold pillow in a freezin bedroom in Burdiehouse by the gift of Radio Luxemburg on what was the only tranny I knew about :)

Finally, always worth an extra mention as a beautifully-crafted piece of song-writing, Lady Grinning Soul was a sweet pleasure to fall asleep to at night as the brilliant curtain-closer.

I learned a lot from this LP and would recommend anyone - including bizarrely anti-piano late-teenagers - to have a good headphone session with.
I like the piano on the track Aladdin Sane. It's very off the wall.
 
An odd album in many ways, as the blurb also picks up. But that was all stuff I noticed later as what got my goat - after discovering Ziggy and only after that Hunky Dory - was whi the feck was this pianist coming in to ruin the show??!

I could still hear much reduced bits by Mick Ronson but this Mike Garson (sp?) pianist took me about a month - really - to completely go 180° on and decide it was inspired genius. Bowie probs just liked him cos he had such a different style from most pop pianists in those days. Garson wasn't scared to bring in his avant-garde stuff tho I do seem to recall an interview at the time that he was very nervous indeed on his audition.

Whatever, Time is a classic with wonderful chords that force-march you through the song, Watch That Man is a foot-stomping starter I remember liking on first hearing on a cold pillow in a freezin bedroom in Burdiehouse by the gift of Radio Luxemburg on what was the only tranny I knew about :)

Finally, always worth an extra mention as a beautifully-crafted piece of song-writing, Lady Grinning Soul was a sweet pleasure to fall asleep to at night as the brilliant curtain-closer.

I learned a lot from this LP and would recommend anyone - including bizarrely anti-piano late-teenagers - to have a good headphone session with.
A great album....Lady Grinning Soul is my favourite Bowie song ever.
 
His best album IMHO and my gateway to his back catalogue.
Lily Rosemary & the Jack of Hearts is a great song
 
A great album....Lady Grinning Soul is my favourite Bowie song ever.
Even the cover was brilliant
 
Even the cover was brilliant
Caused a fair controversy in the papers in the weeks/months before issue!
 
Caused a fair controversy in the papers in the weeks/months before issue!
I remember my mates mum pointing out that "he didn't appear to have a thingy" :5:
 
#43 - Remain In Light - Talking Heads

Remain in Light is the fourth studio album by Talking Heads.

Drawing influence from Nigerian musician Fela Kuti, the band experimented with African polyrhythms, funk, and electronics, recording instrumental tracks as a series of looping grooves.

Frontman David Byrne struggled with writer's block while writing the album, but adopted a scattered, stream-of-consciousness lyrical style as a result inspired by early rap and academic literature on Africa.

Remain in Light was acclaimed by critics, who praised its sonic experimentation, rhythmic innovations, and cohesive merging of disparate genres. It spawned the singles "Once in a Lifetime" and "Houses in Motion".

Critic Reviews:

"The album presents such a strange artistic vision, foreign to what came before but operating as though it were the culmination of a long tradition, that it seems to declare the power of weirdness itself. To be not just strange but singular, to reinvent a form in a way that you can dance to, to smuggle beer into the museum: This is the visceral thrill of art. We want to deny it on theoretical grounds, but we can’t. So we must revise our theories."

"While the album wasn't exactly brimming with singles, it contains three of the band's greatest ever songs and is lifted with every new track."

About 42 places too low imo. At the very least it's probably the greatest A-side in history
 
I remember my mates mum pointing out that "he didn't appear to have a thingy" :5:
Did in the original, that's what caused a mrs whitehouse-like stooshie!
 
Did in the original, that's what caused a mrs whitehouse-like stooshie!
Are you not thinking of Diamond Dogs? 🤔
 
Are you not thinking of Diamond Dogs? 🤔
🤯😱excuse, the flu honest🤧
 
About 42 places too low imo. At the very least it's probably the greatest A-side in history
Agreed.

On another day it could have snuck on my ten and crept up the list a bit.

Fantastic album!
 
Are you not thinking of Diamond Dogs? 🤔
indeed.
 
#40 - Spirit Of Eden - Talk Talk

Spirit of Eden is the fourth studio album by Talk Talk.

Spirit of Eden was a radical departure from Talk Talk's earlier and more accessible albums. Compared to the success of 1986's The Colour of Spring, it was a commercial disappointment. Despite its mixed reception, the album's stature grew more favourable in subsequent years, with contemporary critics describing Spirit of Eden as an early progenitor of the post-rock genre.

Spirit of Eden's moody, experimental nature made it a challenge to promote; one critic said it "is the kind of record which encourages marketing men to commit suicide."

Critic Reviews:

"Depending on who you believe, either a monument to the pretension of a pop band overreaching itself, or a beguiling if flawed experiment that reveals itself in a thousand lush layers. Now credited with inventing post-rock, its hushed-tones cognoscenti-led reputation seems to grow every single year."

"It is a deep blue book of sound, humid with melancholy. Rare is rock music this simple made with such toil and unbearable emotion."

 

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