• Hi there, if you are wanting to register, you will need a registration code. To obtain said code please email hibs@hibeesbounce.com with a brief description of why you want to become part of the bounce. Please also supply us with your IP address Click here if you do not know your IP Thank You. GGTTH

Brexit


HenryLB

Donator
Private Member
Bounce Radge
The last 3 countries to join the EU were Croatia (2013), Bulgaria & Romania (both 2007). None of them have the Euro as their currency.



Sent from my HTC 10 using Tapatalk
All three of them have committed to joining it and two of them already peg their currency to the euro. Bulgaria have already designed their 1 Euro coin. It's very unlikely Scotland could keep the pound and stay in the EU continuously, although I expect there would be large amounts of latitude given to iScotland wrt joining.
 

HenryLB

Donator
Private Member
Bounce Radge
Jim Fairlie, once deputy leader ( and dad of recently passed away chef Andrew) is a big indy guy but also anti EU. It's not as umcommon as the current leadership of The SNP would like folk to be aware of.
Spectator
And more people voted to leave the EU in Scotland than voted for the SNP in 2017. So if one accepts that the SNP are popular then so is wanting to leave the EU!
 

southfieldhibby

Radge Private Member
Private Member
Bounce Radge
Player Sponsor
Lewis Flag Donator
And more people voted to leave the EU in Scotland than voted for the SNP in 2017. So if one accepts that the SNP are popular then so is wanting to leave the EU!
Not comparible. One was a choice between 2 options, the other a choice between 5. Apples and apples etc.
 

Smurf

Radge Private Member
Private Member
Bounce Radge
There's no way we are leaving with no deal. It simply isn't going to happen. It would be a disaster for BOTH the UK and the EU. If May can't bully her deal through the House of Commons, with her running down the clock tactic, with minor concessions given by the EU on the backstop, then our leaving date will be extended. It'll only be after extension and extension and at the final few moments will any deal be reached. It's the uncertainty that's doing us the harm. And then of course at the very last moment of extension after extension after the terms of us leaving are agreed we will then have prolonged negotiations on our future relationship/trade deal with the EU. Throw into the mix a Scottish referendum and the now inevitable Yes vote and the negotiations of Scotland leaving the UK/use of pound or alternatively currency and its relationship with the EU and uncertainty is something to get used to!
 

aggie

Justified Radge
Radge Donator
Private Member
Bounce Radge
Lewis Flag Donator
Monthly Radge
There's no way we are leaving with no deal. It simply isn't going to happen. It would be a disaster for BOTH the UK and the EU. If May can't bully her deal through the House of Commons, with her running down the clock tactic, with minor concessions given by the EU on the backstop, then our leaving date will be extended. It'll only be after extension and extension and at the final few moments will any deal be reached. It's the uncertainty that's doing us the harm. And then of course at the very last moment of extension after extension after the terms of us leaving are agreed we will then have prolonged negotiations on our future relationship/trade deal with the EU. Throw into the mix a Scottish referendum and the now inevitable Yes vote and the negotiations of Scotland leaving the UK/use of pound or alternatively currency and its relationship with the EU and uncertainty is something to get used to!
I'm not so sure. The reason I'm not so sure is that I can't help coming to a certain conclusion when I ask myself why the ERG are so rabid about getting out on March 29th, come what may: i.e. tax avoidance.

This is why Rees-Mogg, a hedge fund owner/manager and the other ERG plutocrats engineered Brexit in the first place. They want to continue to avoid taxes on their incomes and corporate profits, and on April 1 the strategies they use would become illegal, IF England remained in the EU. Hence the March 29 Exit date and the refusal to extend Article 50.

Brexit was initiated soon after the EU directive was finalized, in January 2016, and scheduled to go into effect on Jan. 1, 2019.
Philip May, the husband of Prime Minister Theresa May is also a hedge fund trader, and has probably been selling the pound sterling very short, in hopes of a huge financial gain when the UK is dragged into the financial calamity of Brexit and collapse of the GBP. Draw your own conclusions from this, I know what I think.
 

Leith1975

Radge Private Member
Private Member
Bounce Radge
Part of Bounce
We also have the complications that the EU elections bring if we extend article 50.
 

Murky

Citrix Technical Radge
Private Member
Bounce Radge
Lewis Flag Donator
Gray Boot Sponsor
All three of them have committed to joining it and two of them already peg their currency to the euro. Bulgaria have already designed their 1 Euro coin. It's very unlikely Scotland could keep the pound and stay in the EU continuously, although I expect there would be large amounts of latitude given to iScotland wrt joining.
Labour have committed to abolishing the House of Lords.

Donald Trump committed to building a wall and getting Mexico to pay for it.

I have committed to painting the living room.

Sent from my HTC 10 using Tapatalk
 

Smurf

Radge Private Member
Private Member
Bounce Radge
I'm not so sure. The reason I'm not so sure is that I can't help coming to a certain conclusion when I ask myself why the ERG are so rabid about getting out on March 29th, come what may: i.e. tax avoidance.

This is why Rees-Mogg, a hedge fund owner/manager and the other ERG plutocrats engineered Brexit in the first place. They want to continue to avoid taxes on their incomes and corporate profits, and on April 1 the strategies they use would become illegal, IF England remained in the EU. Hence the March 29 Exit date and the refusal to extend Article 50.

Brexit was initiated soon after the EU directive was finalized, in January 2016, and scheduled to go into effect on Jan. 1, 2019.
Philip May, the husband of Prime Minister Theresa May is also a hedge fund trader, and has probably been selling the pound sterling very short, in hopes of a huge financial gain when the UK is dragged into the financial calamity of Brexit and collapse of the GBP. Draw your own conclusions from this, I know what I think.
Fair comment. For me there's still too many within the cabinet who won't let a no deal happen.
 

aggie

Justified Radge
Radge Donator
Private Member
Bounce Radge
Lewis Flag Donator
Monthly Radge
Fair comment. For me there's still too many within the cabinet who won't let a no deal happen.
I certainly hope so. But it is unquestionably the default option, it’s about the only certainty in play at the moment.

Extending A50 needs the govt to ask the EU, whose member states then need to agree. Who in the govt is going to pull the trigger? All the power rests with the executive.

May’s deal requires a renegotiation that the EU have repeatedly ruled out. As it stands, it’s already been rejected. Will it pass if asked again, simply because there’s only days left?

Revoking the whole shebang needs the govt, and to an extent parliament, to admit that it’s a busted flush and can’t be done.

You voted leave, if I remember correctly - what is it you thought you were voting for, and what do you now want to happen?

What do you think will happen? I wish I had your faith that enough of these craven, lying bastards will own their mistake at the 11th hour.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

greencol

Skivin cooncil Radge
Private Member
Bounce Radge
I certainly hope so. But it is unquestionably the default option, it’s about the only certainty in play at the moment.

Extending A50 needs the govt to ask the EU, whose member states then need to agree. Who in the govt is going to pull the trigger? All the power rests with the executive.

May’s deal requires a renegotiation that the EU have repeatedly ruled out. As it stands, it’s already been rejected. Will it pass if asked again, simply because there’s only days left?

Revoking the whole shebang needs the govt, and to an extent parliament, to admit that it’s a busted flush and can’t be done.

You voted leave, if I remember correctly - what is it you thought you were voting for, and what do you now want to happen?

What do you think will happen? I wish I had your faith that enough of these craven, lying bastards will own their mistake at the 11th hour.





Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Therein lies the problem.
Many of them dont see it as a mistake.
And many of them dont give a flying if there is no deal.
 

Smurf

Radge Private Member
Private Member
Bounce Radge
I certainly hope so. But it is unquestionably the default option, it’s about the only certainty in play at the moment.

Extending A50 needs the govt to ask the EU, whose member states then need to agree. Who in the govt is going to pull the trigger? All the power rests with the executive.

May’s deal requires a renegotiation that the EU have repeatedly ruled out. As it stands, it’s already been rejected. Will it pass if asked again, simply because there’s only days left?

Revoking the whole shebang needs the govt, and to an extent parliament, to admit that it’s a busted flush and can’t be done.

You voted leave, if I remember correctly - what is it you thought you were voting for, and what do you now want to happen?

What do you think will happen? I wish I had your faith that enough of these craven, lying bastards will own their mistake at the 11th hour.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I did indeed vote to leave. As did the majority of those who voted. This bollocks that those who did vote out did so because they are racist or because of the side of a bus is ridiculous. I asked myself a simple question. Would i vote to join the EU? And absolutely I wouldn't. For me it's a corrupt cartel. It's not run for the people of Europe. It's run for business. All these unelected commissioners. As Tony Benn would say, who elected them? To whom are they accountable to and how can we remove them? And we can't. Look at how the EU is treating the democratic will of the people of Catalonia. It's awful. The EU can't let the UK leave with a good deal as soon others will want to follow. I want a deal with the EU. I'd be happy with free movement of people. That all said I'd actually be happy if we stayed in as it's a fuckin mess hijacked by right wing nut jobs from a UK perspective....
 

southfieldhibby

Radge Private Member
Private Member
Bounce Radge
Player Sponsor
Lewis Flag Donator
All EU commissioners are elected, by the head of state from each EU country. So 'all these' unelected folk are reps from each EU country, nominated by the elected head of state from each member. Do you have the same problem with ambassadors @Smurf ? They're accountable to the European Parliament btw, anything they propose must be passed by the parliament. Fairly democratic process overall I think, not sure where folk get all bothered by them. I'd love a Scottish one. So Tony Benn was talking pish.

Free movement of people = free movement of trade. If you accept both of those but want to be out the collective I'm pretty sure you have to accept ECHR...but without any representation. Seems obvious. Also seems spectacularly stupid.

Not all folk who voted to leave are racists. All racists voted to leave though.

I think The EU are nearing the point of exasperation to the point they'll refuse to budge one millimetre from the agreed deal, take it or leave it, no extension to A50 because it causes confusion, plus EU elections coming up they won't want doubt over, plus we're being childish brats and they can't comprehend how a government and parliament can be so stupid.

Leave on current deal
Leave on no deal
Stay, but with penalties down the road.
 

Jack

Bounce Flag Co-Owner
Flag Owner
Radge Donator
Private Member
Bounce Radge
Player Sponsor
Monthly Radge
Ladies Player Sponsor
Gray Boot Sponsor
Stay, but with penalties down the road.
Good post M.

What do you see as penalties down the road?

We'd be remaining on the same terms as we have at the moment. The only thing I can think of is it might take a while to again become one of the more influential members as Westminster has done it's best to diminish our credibility.
 

Smurf

Radge Private Member
Private Member
Bounce Radge
All EU commissioners are elected, by the head of state from each EU country. So 'all these' unelected folk are reps from each EU country, nominated by the elected head of state from each member. Do you have the same problem with ambassadors @Smurf ? They're accountable to the European Parliament btw, anything they propose must be passed by the parliament. Fairly democratic process overall I think, not sure where folk get all bothered by them. I'd love a Scottish one. So Tony Benn was talking pish.
So on the basis of that argument all members of the House of Lords are 'elected'?
 

HenryLB

Donator
Private Member
Bounce Radge
Not comparible. One was a choice between 2 options, the other a choice between 5. Apples and apples etc.
That's a fair point. But the fact remains that a significant portion of the Scottish electorate, more than vote for indy supporting parties, wanted to leave the EU.
 

HenryLB

Donator
Private Member
Bounce Radge
I'm not so sure. The reason I'm not so sure is that I can't help coming to a certain conclusion when I ask myself why the ERG are so rabid about getting out on March 29th, come what may: i.e. tax avoidance.

This is why Rees-Mogg, a hedge fund owner/manager and the other ERG plutocrats engineered Brexit in the first place. They want to continue to avoid taxes on their incomes and corporate profits, and on April 1 the strategies they use would become illegal, IF England remained in the EU. Hence the March 29 Exit date and the refusal to extend Article 50.

Brexit was initiated soon after the EU directive was finalized, in January 2016, and scheduled to go into effect on Jan. 1, 2019.
Philip May, the husband of Prime Minister Theresa May is also a hedge fund trader, and has probably been selling the pound sterling very short, in hopes of a huge financial gain when the UK is dragged into the financial calamity of Brexit and collapse of the GBP. Draw your own conclusions from this, I know what I think.
You're definitely right that their culture is heavily opposed to the EU's new regs and they're terrified of its tax laws, so have been big advocates to get out for that reason.

But this notion that hedge funds are all going to make billions and therefore engineered it isn't the whole story. For their overall position most funds aren't like Crispin Odey's and the other bears - ie set up medium/long term to profit from falling UK markets. The majority prefer a strong economy with rising equities at least most of the time, which isn't to say that they won't opportunistically try to gain from something like Brexit, but their long-term net position - and that of big capital generally - is based on rising stock markets.

Odey's funds lost 60% of their value in early 2018 because the economy was much more buoyant than he'd bet so these guys aren't super svengalis pulling the strings at will. Rees Mogg's funds are all in emerging markets afaik so I'm not sure if brexit will have much effect on them. He and others like him will certainly already have hedged their UK-related positions by doing stuff like buying dollars etc but it's a defensive part of their strategy for most, not an Odey-style 'bet the farm' on disaster.

But don't get me wrong, I think these guys are about the biggest arseholes alive.
 

HenryLB

Donator
Private Member
Bounce Radge
All EU commissioners are elected, by the head of state from each EU country.
That's a huge stretch! He obviously meant democratically elected in the sense that they could be removed by a mass vote in which all the electorate can participate.

I am a firm remainer but there are big problems with democratic representation in the EU, it has behaved pretty badly in lots of ways, especially to Greece, and it's partially created and then ignored crises on its borders. It's pretty uncontroversial to think that it needs reformed.

I think there's a really good chance of No Deal. And if it happens there's subsequently a very good chance that we will face a chaotic six months or more, not ruling out stuff like breakdowns in public order, swift rises in unemployment, food supply issues etc.
 

Online statistics

Members online
52
Guests online
173
Total visitors
225
Top